Archive for May, 2009

Ear passions

Friday, May 29th, 2009

This article is about a brilliant ENT whose love for his profession, inspires others. It reminded me of a quote of Ralph Waldo Emerson:
Every great and commanding movement in the annals of the world is due to the triumph of enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever achieved without it.

Giving out an earful and loving it

I don’t know much about Dr. Reardon, my ear, nose and throat specialist, except that the man is in love with ears. After all the decades he’s been looking at them, you’d think he’d be done. Seen one, seen ’em all. Bring on some toes and elbows, please.

But every time he walks into the examining room where I sit with my clogged up ear, he is almost whistling, eager to get to his chart and his very realistic “you can take it apart and move it around” facsimile of an ear and explain to me how the middle ear is a hollow chamber in the bone of the skull.

 He is as earnest as a sonnet. And not just to me. Every day his office is packed with people, but no one seems to mind waiting because when he gets to you he is totally tuned into you.

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Chronic otitis media is the result of long-term damage to the middle ear brought about by infection and inflammation, he serenades. Mastoiditis is an infection of the mastoid bone of the skull. See here. This is called cholesteatoma and it usually results from repeated middle-ear infections.

He is like Adam giving a private tour of the Garden of Eden. And he doesn’t just recite the names of things. He explains. And extols.

He makes me think of my friend Antonio, who always beamed when he was sharing the secrets of his perfect marinara sauce. Some cream. Some tomatoes. But not just any tomatoes. “You see this one? Not good enough. You see this? Here, feel it. Smell it. Fresh. Everything has to be fresh. And carrots. Carrots are key.”

And then there’s Paul, a landscaper, who knocked on my door just the other day holding in his hand what appeared to be a dead branch from a dead tree in my yard and declaring the tree alive. “There’s still some green here, see? Give it a chance. Water it. Feed it. Don’t cut it down yet.”

It’s amazing that some people fall in love not just with the obvious beauties, things that everyone loves – other people and babies and dogs and birds and sunsets and lakes and snow-peaked mountains – but with ears and red sauces and even scraggly half-dead trees. And that every day in so many ways, this love changes everything.

You don’t think much about ears and how they work and what life would be like if they didn’t. Or about knees and hearts and lungs and eyes and all the things our bodies do until one day they don’t. You don’t think about a specialist until you need one. Until you have something a pill can’t cure.

We can fix that ear, my specialist told me for the zillionth time three weeks ago. All we have to do is. . . And there he was at the chart again, at his computer pulling up my CAT scan showing me in detail how my ear is supposed to work. And why, exactly, it wasn’t. As confident as Jesus with the fish and the loaves. Fix that ear? Feed the throngs? Not a problem.

Me? I was a disciple still, thinking this is going to take a miracle.

Dr. Reardon wouldn’t call it a miracle. He performed a procedure he’s done a thousand times. But the truth of it is he acts as though it’s all a miracle. The way the ear works. The technology that allows him to see if it’s working. The ear’s structure. The way it heals. And the way he is allowed to participate in the healing.

I have a feeling God is looking down on this man and thinking, “You know, you get it. You appreciate my design. You respect my creation. You’re helping people. And you’re doing a good job.”

Under the radar. Out of the news. Away from the spotlight. Where so much of the good that people do takes place.

Source: http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2009/05/17/giving_out_an_earful_and_loving_it/

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Locum Audiologists Needed

Friday, May 29th, 2009


One moment there is no jobs and audiologists queue up, the next moment the reverse happens.

It feels as if we’re in the weather forecast business.
Fortunately today’s outlook is Sunny and we’re in need of audiologists. Whether you’re in a permanent position and considering a locum position or whether you’re an existing locum please send us your CV. We’ll be happy to inform you of vacant positions. If you’re happy where you are but would like to keep an ear on the ground contact us as well and we’ll keep you informed.

All the best,

Audio jobs

Click here to email us with your CV.

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The highlight of Audiometry comments

Thursday, May 28th, 2009

Testing peoples’ hearing is never mundane as proved by the following, priceless incidents:

When giving the instructions for masking, I always say to the patient: “You might hear some wind blowing in your other now. Just ignore it completely and only press the button when you hear the beeps” after which this lady quickly responded: “O, much like I have to do with my husband then!”

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Another lady who was visibly stressed by having to concentrate so hard to hear the tones pointed out: “Dear, I’m afraid my teeth clatter too much, I can’t hear those sounds” Thankfully she didn’t remove them to continue the test!

And then there was the lady who asked where she could undress when she entered the booth. Puzzled I asked why she wanted to do that and she replied: “Well the doctor sent me for a urine test” and when I explained he said hearing test, she laughed loudly saying that’s probably why he sent her then!

Dezi Bell

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What we say to dogs…

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

and what they hear (click to view).

What dogs hear

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B.

An elderly lady goes to the doctor.
Dr I suffer with flatulence, sure they don’t smell and make no noise but still I can’t take it any more.
Well take these pills every day and come back in a week.
Dr what did you do to me? I still suffer with flatulence and now it smells as well!
Oh very well, now about your hearing…

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£200 up for Grabs

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

Do you know anyone considering the taking a new Audiology perm or locum job? Put them in touch with us and four weeks into their first placement through Audiology Jobs we’ll pay you £200.

Audiology Referral Bonus

There are no catches and we’ll do the cash payment directly into your bank account. You can spend the money in any way you want.

There is also no limit to the number of Audiologists you can recommend. We will reward you for every person that joins us following your introduction.

To Email us your friend’s details, click here.

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Somethink wrong with your hearing?

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

See Hear Speak
Morris, an 82 year-old man, went to the doctor to get a physical. A few days later the doctor saw Morris walking down the street with a gorgeous young woman on his arm. A couple of days later the doctor spoke to Morris and said, “You’re really doing great, aren’t you?”
Morris replied, “Just doing what you said, Doc: ‘Get a hot mamma and be cheerful.'”
The doctor said, “I didn’t say that. I said, ‘You’ve got a heart murmur. Be careful.'”

Time to have a laugh, send us more funny stuff. Click here

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HODs send us your vacant jobs

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

Dear HOD,

We’re in need of locum and permanent Audiology Jobs. Apart from seasoned audiologists we also had a few newly graduates who are on the job hunt.

We’ll offer your department a £200 refund after the locum / perm staff member worked with you for 6 weeks.

Audiology Referral Bonus

To take up this offer and to request CVs of available Audiologists, click here.

All the best,

Rudolf


Stem Cell Research Poll – Right or Wrong?

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

You’ve seen / read the previous article on “New Stem Cell Therapy May Lead To Treatment For Deafness”

Please participate in the following poll; As an Audiologist do you agree with Auditory Stem Cell Research?

(Only click on one of the images once)

 

Yes, I agree with Stem Cell Research

 

No, I do not agree with Stem Cell Research

I’ll send you the results in next week’s email.


New Stem Cell Therapy May Lead To Treatment For Deafness

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

The University of Sheffield has successfully isolated human auditory stem cells from foetal cochleae and found they had the capacity to differentiate into sensory hair cells and neurons. These have the potential for a variety of applications….

ScienceDaily (Mar. 23, 2009) — Deafness affects more than 250 million people worldwide. It typically involves the loss of sensory receptors, called hair cells, for their “tufts” of hair-like protrusions, and their associated neurons. The transplantation of stem cells that are capable of producing functional cell types might be a promising treatment for hearing impairment, but no human candidate cell type has been available to develop this technology.


Cross section of the cochlea, showing hair cell nerves. (Credit: Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

A new study led by Dr. Marcelo N. Rivolta of the University of Sheffield has successfully isolated human auditory stem cells from fetal cochleae (the auditory portion of the inner ear) and found they had the capacity to differentiate into sensory hair cells and neurons.
The researchers painstakingly dissected and cultured cochlear cells from 9- to 11-week-old human fetuses. The cells were expanded and maintained in vitro for up to one year, with continued division for the first 7 to 8 months and up to 30 population doublings, which is similar to other non-embryonic stem cell populations, such as bone marrow. Gene expression analysis showed that all cell lines expressed otic markers that lead to the development of the inner ear as well as markers expressed by pluripotent embryonic stem cells, from which all tissues and organs develop.

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They were able to formulate conditions that allowed for the progressive differentiation into neurons and hair cells with the same functional electrophysiological characteristics as cells seen in vivo.
“The results are the first in vitro renewable stem cell system derived from the human auditory organ and have the potential for a variety of applications, such as studying the development of human cochlear neurons and hair cells, as models for drug screening and helping to develop cell-based therapies for deafness,” say the authors.
Although the hair cell-like cells did not show the typical formation of a hair bundle, the authors suggest that future studies will aim to improve the differentiation system. They are currently working on using the knowledge gleaned from this study to optimize the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into ear cell types.
“Although considerable information has been obtained about the embryology of the ear using animal models, the lack of a human system has impaired the validation of such information,” the authors note.
“Access to human cells that can differentiate should allow the exploration of features unique to humans that may not be applicable to animal models,” says Donald G. Phinney, co-editor of the journal. The protocol they developed to expand and isolate human fetal auditory stem cells may be able to be adapted for deriving clinical-grade cells with potential therapeutic applications.
Dr Ralph Holme, director of biomedical research for Royal National Institute for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People, said: “There are currently no treatments to restore permanent hearing loss so this has the potential to make a difference to millions of deaf people.”
The study is published in the April issue of Stem Cells.

Article source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090323093129.htm

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Who cut off Van Gogh’s ear?

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

Should we give ear to the latest wild theories about Vincent van Gogh?

Vincent van Gogh did not cut off his own ear but lost it in a fight with fellow artist Paul Gauguin in a row outside a brothel, it has been claimed.
It has long been accepted that the mentally ill Dutch painter cut off his own ear with a razor after the row in Arles, southern France, in 1888.
But a new book, based on the original police investigation, claims Gauguin swiped Van Gogh’s ear with a sword.
The authors argue the official version of events contains inconsistencies.
Witness statements
The book, titled In Van Gogh’s Ear: Paul Gauguin and the Pact of Silence, is the product of 10 years of research by German academics Hans Kaufmann and Rita Wildegans.
They looked at witness accounts and letters sent by the two artists, concluding that the row ended with Gauguin – a keen fencer – cutting his friend’s ear off.
Van Gogh then apparently wrapped it in cloth and handed it to a prostitute, called Rachel.
Mr Kaufmann said it was not clear whether it was an accident or a deliberate attempt to injure Van Gogh, but afterwards both men agreed to tell the police the self-harm story to protect Gauguin.
He said the traditional version of events is based on contradictory and improbable evidence, and no independent witness statement exists.
“Gauguin was not present at the supposed self-mutilation,” he told Le Figaro newspaper in France.
“As for Van Gogh, he didn’t confirm anything. Their behaviour afterwards and various suggestions by the protagonists indicate they were hiding the truth.”
Gauguin later moved to Tahiti, where he produced some of his most famous works. Van Gogh died in 1890 after shooting himself in the chest.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/arts_and_culture/8033650.stm

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